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Western Patrol Club Inc.



Author Topic: A week in the Desert  (Read 17576 times)

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Offline RustyNails

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #20 on: 02 June, 2013, 12:28:58 PM »
welcome back guys, glad you had fun and can't wait to read the report

Offline Doc Evil

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #21 on: 02 June, 2013, 12:41:14 PM »
Kept an eye on you via 'spot' looks like a great trip. Noted that you called civilisation at Perth not Leonora or laverton or even kalgoorlie

The trip is now over. Back to the grind........ :'(
"If you're going out there, I'll give you a tip. It's wild and it's rough and you're in for a trip. But once you've gone this far off the track, you won't turn around, and you'll never look back."

Our lockers, who art in the diffs Hallowed be thy name, thy traction come,thy will be done,in mud as it is in rocks,give us this day,our daily tread and forgive us our rollovers…

***in australia - if your gut as to chest ratio exceed 1.5 as to 1 - you MUST grow a goatee - its the law***

expatkiwi

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #22 on: 02 June, 2013, 02:36:58 PM »
So this is what it's like being back around people.

I will put something together soon for the forum, but just to say a big thank you to Doc for leading me, Marion and Marley out in the bush, We had a ball and are already looking forward to our next trip having well and truly caught the desert bug..
Lots to report, travelled a few Km along the way, and learn't lots.... I'm not sure we are talkative enough for Adrian, but he certainly appeared to tolerate us well..
I would be very happy to travel again with Adrian in the bush, he was well organized and was a wealth of knowledge.. Thanks.. ;D

Couple of pics to wet the appetite..




Offline Doc Evil

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #23 on: 02 June, 2013, 04:57:59 PM »
All wrong mate, thoroughly enjoyed your company and to pass on some of my knowledge and experiences.

It is a spectacular country out there and as I said, there are a lot, if not most, of people who have never experienced a sunrise or sunset out in the desert, let alone travel one of the most iconic tracks in Australia.

Oh, how's marley?
"If you're going out there, I'll give you a tip. It's wild and it's rough and you're in for a trip. But once you've gone this far off the track, you won't turn around, and you'll never look back."

Our lockers, who art in the diffs Hallowed be thy name, thy traction come,thy will be done,in mud as it is in rocks,give us this day,our daily tread and forgive us our rollovers…

***in australia - if your gut as to chest ratio exceed 1.5 as to 1 - you MUST grow a goatee - its the law***

Grover

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #24 on: 02 June, 2013, 08:43:26 PM »
All wrong mate, thoroughly enjoyed your company and to pass on some of my knowledge and experiences.

It is a spectacular country out there and as I said, there are a lot, if not most, of people who have never experienced a sunrise or sunset out in the desert, let alone travel one of the most iconic tracks in Australia.

Oh, how's marley?

Funny you say that Doc; during the many years I have spent outside of Australia, the one thing I constantly look back and remember is a sunrise in the desert. Nothing else signifies what it is to be an Australian quite like the desert sunrise.

Now to business......the suspense is killing us......photo's?

expatkiwi

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #25 on: 02 June, 2013, 09:26:40 PM »
Not my work.. but something too start with..

As It wasn't done by me.. features the dog a bit..

Hey Jerry boy, hey Marley girl

Offline Doc Evil

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #26 on: 02 June, 2013, 10:40:42 PM »
Brilliant  8) 8)
"If you're going out there, I'll give you a tip. It's wild and it's rough and you're in for a trip. But once you've gone this far off the track, you won't turn around, and you'll never look back."

Our lockers, who art in the diffs Hallowed be thy name, thy traction come,thy will be done,in mud as it is in rocks,give us this day,our daily tread and forgive us our rollovers…

***in australia - if your gut as to chest ratio exceed 1.5 as to 1 - you MUST grow a goatee - its the law***

TheFlyingBadger

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #27 on: 02 June, 2013, 10:57:58 PM »
:D*

Wayne57

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #28 on: 03 June, 2013, 03:25:22 PM »
Not my work.. but something too start with..

As It wasn't done by me.. features the dog a bit..

Great video............what DOG ;D ;D ;D

expatkiwi

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #29 on: 05 June, 2013, 11:54:58 AM »
Well as you all know we headed to the outback last week and all returned safe, and mostly well, not sure what was up with the dog, we thought she may have swallowed a bone, she was not well on the way home, but has since returned to normal.
There was no major breakages for either of us, but having developed an appreciation for just how isolated the outback is I was happy with the spares and tools I carried just in case. The only thing that I used was a couple of zip ties. On the broken list for me was two spot light mounts (welds too weak) and the aftermarket front sway bar mount came away where the link joins the bar.. I left it that way, no biggie..
Overall I was really happy with the way the Patrol performed over the trip, fuel economy was sound at around 17L per hundred, with all the weight and wind resistance from a large case on the roof, and the fact we spent a fair bit of time in soft sand. By the time I got home I had used around 400 litres of fuel and we had done close to 3200km (Doc may have a more accurate figure)
There are things I would do differently next time in regards to what I take, and how I carry it but all in all I got it pretty close.
Myself, Marion and Marley ventured off on Saturday the 25th of May and met Doc at the red rooster in Midland, after pleasantries and realising my 2way was not transmitting we headed off. The trip to Kalgoorlie was unremarkable, amd along the way was able to sort the UHF having discovered I had done something to the settings, so after arriving we set up camp for the first time. Easy enough, so after venturing out to “town” to get dinner it was bed time. 600km’s done.


Next day we headed to Rawlina, We called past the super pit on the way for the obligatory look at the hole in the ground and it was soon after that the bitumen ended and we hit the gravel. It was pretty easy going, 330 odd km’s on the trans access rd. Doc found a spot a bit before Rawlina as it was getting late in the arvo. The great thing about this spot was it is next to the east/west rail line. Just after arriving we were treated with our first train belting past. We camped about 40 metres from the line and through the night there was at least another half a dozen trains that went through.
Train at Rawlina


Next day after getting going we planned to head to Neale junction. After a short drive to Rawlina we were greeted with the entrance to the Connie Sue highway.  Even at this point looking back I’m not sure I knew exactly what to expect, but that soon changed. We spent an hour or more heading forward making our way through a few gates heading north, not encountering any problems. At a cross raod here we did encounter 1 of the three other cars we saw in a three day period, one of the locals heading out from one of the communities. Neale junction was a nice place to pitch the tent with covered tables, fire pits and even a toilet. .Doc set a fire this night but was short on fire place conversation as we headed to bed not long after dark, and dinner as we were buggered.
Connie Sue Highway


We spent two nights here venturing out on the day time to do some exploring, which included the plane wreck that occurred some 10 or so years ago when a small group were returning to Perth from doing electoral duties, even though there was not much to hit, they were still lucky not to have collected any of the bigger trees. We also drove too, correct me if I’m wrong, the most isolated road house in the country, ilkurka where we were able to refuel after about 850 odd km since last topping the tanks. Pity they did not accept 4c a litre discount vouchers, as the cost of fuel was $2.70l. Another big positive to being there in the middle of nowhere was we were able to restock on important essentials like unhealthy snacks. I think we covered around 300km’s this day on tracks again that varied from soft sand to hard rocky ground to everything in between. The other great thing about this place was they has showers and toilets, although to have a shower Doc and I needed to set a fire and heat the water.

Plane wreck Anne Beadell highway


The next day our mission was another 300km day heading to the Tjukayiria road house making some small detours along the way to points of interest. There certainly is some pretty spectacular things to see, not far from the “beaten track” We made it to the road house and after checking in were straight to a well-earned shower and freshen up, doling the laundry and then one of their home cooked meals.
We ventured out from the road house the next day after a breakfast of bacon and eggs on a day trip to explore various local tracks including the David Carnegie and stopped at a couple of places including a watering hole that the local indigenous people showed him when he was first surveying the track, and his party were almost out of water, and would have surely perished.  We were treated to some great hospitality at the road house while there which included them having us over to theirs this night for a BBQ, which included one of the biggest T bone steaks I have seen in a long time. What was surprising a little to me was we caught both warm and cold weather conditions on the trip, up until this day we had had temps in the mid 20’s during the day, but experienced temps in low teens this day, and there was even some light showers on and off.


With the trip home fast approaching we needed to decide a plan of attack, I said I was keen to look at making it home in one hit. We packed up and hit the road. The GPS at the start of the day showed something like 1250 to Perth, but we plodded along stopping regularly, including a fuel stop in Kal to top the tanks with a 100L of diesel, and after leaving the road house at 10am on Saturday pulled into our driveway at 0200 Sunday.
We both had a great time, and as this was my first trip to the outback can say I have been bitten by the bug, and look forward to future exploring in the outback.
Big thanks to Doc for leading us along we really appreciated it.  ;D ;D

For anybody that may want to see the pics here is a link to my photo bucket account.
http://s919.photobucket.com/user/spud027/library/A%20week%20in%20the%20outback?sort=3&page=2

BigBaz

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A week in the Desert
« Reply #30 on: 05 June, 2013, 12:43:21 PM »
Sounds like a great trip well done to Doc and yourselves.

Offline Doc Evil

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #31 on: 05 June, 2013, 12:58:55 PM »
Day 1.

Saturday morning dawned clear but cold. The time had come. We were off to do one of the most iconic tracks in the country that has been carved by the legendary Len Beadall, the Connie Sue Highway. This Highway was named after his daughter, Connie Sue. We were also doing part of the Anne Beadall Highway (Named after Len’s wife) another Aussie iconic track.
I finish off loading up the Patrol, grab a quick cuppa and I’m away to meet Jeremy (Expatkiwi) his partner in crime Marion and the adorable pup Marley (the boxer).
The meet time was 8.30 and I arrive with 10mins to spare and Jeremy is eagerly waiting. Brief introductions and club paperwork done, and we’re away. This was going to be,as it usually is when trying to get to any destination of worth, the boring bitumen bit. I had booked us into the Caravan park in Kalgoorlie for the night and me being soft, I had booked myself a cabin.
The km’s trundle under our wheels until Cunderdin where a leg stretch and pit stop is taken. Back to the white line fever until Southern Cross where we stop again for a stretch and coffee break. Now it’s the last blast from here to Kal. We reach our overnight destination of the Prospector Caravan Park around 4.00pm. The tent of Jeremy’s was set up for the first time. We then hit Kal. for a look around and hit the shops for the last of the provisions. A last supper of take away is the order of the night. We retire early so as to charge the batteries for what is in front of us.

Day 2.
We’re up at around 7.30. Plan was to be on the road at about 9.00am. With the trucks packed and occupants ready to go we trundle out of the caravan park as the designated time of 9.00am. Both trucks are doing well considering they are loaded to the hilt and the fuel economy is better than expected when the servo was sourced along with breakfast. Off to the super pit for a look see. The lookout has changed somewhat since I was there last. The carpark was on the west side of the lookout enclosure, now it’s on the east if my memory is good. Thinking back, now I’m not too sure…….
The turnoff eluded me and after a slight detour thru the outskirts of Kalgoorlie and trekking thru some abandoned mines, a “U” turn is executed and the correct path found. It wasn’t long until we were on the dirt. The dirt was now in front of us for around 2000km. We stopped and aired down a little bit.
Whilst airing down, the 1st of the many trains we will see trundled past. An impressive sight for the first time I can assure you. As we were driving, the terrain and landscape altered from the typical Nullabor plains to tall wooded areas where Salmon Gums stood proud to a stand of Desert Oak, meanwhile our trucks bumped over the fairly smooth but limestone laden track.
Not a lot exists at the old “whistle stops” on the rail line now, Zanthus, Kitchener, 913 Mile so after having a poke around at these sites and as it was approaching 4.00pm WA time and being near the SA border, it was getting dark quite quickly so we started to look for a decent camp site. We decided to prop at Naretha, again, not much there only a few stock yards and a shed.
With camp set up, and food devoured with another train rumbling past it was quite dark. We decided to turn in early after a decent drive.
During the night several trains “visited” and a pleasant surprise just on sunrise was the Indian Pacific was propped for approx. 20 min. It was quite surprising how quiet this train was.

Day 3..............soon.............
"If you're going out there, I'll give you a tip. It's wild and it's rough and you're in for a trip. But once you've gone this far off the track, you won't turn around, and you'll never look back."

Our lockers, who art in the diffs Hallowed be thy name, thy traction come,thy will be done,in mud as it is in rocks,give us this day,our daily tread and forgive us our rollovers…

***in australia - if your gut as to chest ratio exceed 1.5 as to 1 - you MUST grow a goatee - its the law***

UKKIWI

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Re: A week in the Desert
« Reply #32 on: 13 August, 2013, 08:33:57 PM »
Doc, I've just read this and it's half done! I need to know how it ends! Heeelllllp! ;-)

 

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